beverleyshiller
theantidote:

Frozen Frangelico Coffee
4 cups strong cold coffee1 cup Frangelico2/3 cup heavy cream6 tablespoons pure maple syrup
Stir cold coffee and Frangelico together in a bowl. Transfer to the freezer, and chill until slushy but slightly frozen, anywhere from 4-6 hours. Stir the mixture several times during this time.

Whisk heavy cream in a standing mixer until soft peaks are just forming. Add maple syrup and whisk until soft peaks return.

To serve: divide coffee mixture among 4-6 glasses and  top with equal amounts of whipped cream.

theantidote:

Frozen Frangelico Coffee

4 cups strong cold coffee
1 cup Frangelico
2/3 cup heavy cream
6 tablespoons pure maple syrup

Stir cold coffee and Frangelico together in a bowl. Transfer to the freezer, and chill until slushy but slightly frozen, anywhere from 4-6 hours. Stir the mixture several times during this time.
Whisk heavy cream in a standing mixer until soft peaks are just forming. Add maple syrup and whisk until soft peaks return.
To serve: divide coffee mixture among 4-6 glasses and  top with equal amounts of whipped cream.
ohhelloholly
devilduck:

Seattle’s first coffee cup was made from a walrus skull!
It’s carved from the tusk socket of a walrus skull and handle is the front part of the cheekbone.
Most likely made by an Alaskan native carver around 1900, and probably sold or traded to someone who brought it to Seattle.
At some point, it got lost or thrown away and became buried. In the mid-1950s, some children found it while digging in the backyard of their Laurelhurst house.
See it at the Burke Museum, Seattle: http://www.burkemuseum.org/imagine
More: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/03/30/3124105/digging-into-collection-exhibit.html

devilduck:

Seattle’s first coffee cup was made from a walrus skull!

It’s carved from the tusk socket of a walrus skull and handle is the front part of the cheekbone.

Most likely made by an Alaskan native carver around 1900, and probably sold or traded to someone who brought it to Seattle.

At some point, it got lost or thrown away and became buried. In the mid-1950s, some children found it while digging in the backyard of their Laurelhurst house.

See it at the Burke Museum, Seattle: http://www.burkemuseum.org/imagine

More: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/03/30/3124105/digging-into-collection-exhibit.html